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David Bollier is a journalist, activist, and longtime scholar of the commons.  He is Co-founder of the Commons Strategies Group, Co-founder of Public Knowledge, and Founding Editor of Onthecommons.org from 2003 to 2010.  He now blogs at Bollier.org.  A Senior Fellow at the Norman Lear Center, Bollier is the author of more than ten books, including Brand Name Bullies and Silent Theft. He lives in Amherst, MA. Read more...

About the author

David Bollier has been exploring the commons as a new paradigm of culture, politics and economics for nearly ten years. He pursues this work as a journalist, activist and author.  A co-founder of the Commons Strategies Group, Bollier speaks frequently internationally about the commons and blogs at Bollier.org.  He was Founding Editor of Onthecommons.org from 2003 to 2010.  Viral Spiral is Bollier's third book exploring the commons. His 2002 book, Silent Theft: The Private Plunder of Our Common Wealth (Routledge), provides a popular introduction to the commons and the many pernicious market enclosures now under way. Bollier's 2005 book, Brand Name Bullies: The Quest to Own and Control Culture (John Wiley), focuses on the alarming copyright and trademark enclosures of our cultural commons, and how this is harming creativity and democracy. Since 1984, Bollier has worked with American television writer/ producer Norman Lear on a variety of special projects and policy issues. In addition to his work with the Commons Strategies Group, Bollier is Senior Fellow at the Norman Lear Center at the USC Annenberg Center for Communication and co-founder of Public Knowledge, a Washington policy advocacy organization dedicated to protecting the information commons. Bollier lives in Amherst, Massachusetts.

Praise for Bollier's Previous Work

“Hilarious and appalling.” —PUBLISHERS WEEKLY (STARRED REVIEW) “Jaw-dropping stories.” —CHICAGO SUN-TIMES “A thought-provoking cautionary tale of where our cultural heritage is rapidly headed, if unchecked.” —PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER “Provocative. ... Bollier raises issues that almost nobody wants to talk about anymore. If he's not always right, he's always on target.” —NEWSWEEK “[Bollier] get[s] at . .. the fundamental, primary political issue that can be the underlying value for regenerating progressive politics in our country, and that value Is the common good versus private greed.” —JIM HIGHTOWER, TEXAS OBSERVER